Downhill Longboarding Techniques

Downhill Longboarding Techniques Explained - Wake2o

Adrenaline Fueled Downhill Longboarding - Explained

Downhill longboarding is a high-speed, adrenaline-fueled activity that involves riding down steep hills and navigating sharp turns. It requires a lot of skill, practice, and patience to master, but with the right techniques and equipment, anyone can become a proficient downhill longboarder. In this article, we will explore some of the most essential downhill longboarding techniques to help you improve your skills and stay safe while riding.

  • Body Position

    One of the most crucial aspects of downhill longboarding is body position. Your body position can greatly affect your speed, balance, and control on the board. When riding downhill, it is important to keep your weight centred over the board, with your feet shoulder-width apart and your knees bent. This will help you maintain stability and balance while riding at high speeds.

    To maximize your speed, tuck your body into a streamlined position by bending your elbows and bringing your hands close to your body. This will reduce wind resistance and allow you to accelerate faster down the hill. However, be sure to keep your head up and your eyes on the road ahead to anticipate any potential obstacles or turns.

    • Speed Control

      Speed control is another essential aspect of downhill longboarding. It is important to have the ability to slow down or stop your board if needed, especially when riding down steep hills. One of the most effective ways to control your speed is by carving, which involves making a series of S-shaped turns to reduce your speed and maintain control.

      To carve, shift your weight onto your front foot and lean into the turn while simultaneously applying pressure to the edge of the board with your back foot. This will initiate a turn and slow down your speed. Once you reach the apex of the turn, shift your weight onto your back foot and lean in the opposite direction to initiate a second turn. Repeat this process to make a series of S-shaped turns down the hill.

      Another way to control your speed is by using your foot to drag on the ground. This technique, known as foot braking, involves dragging the sole of your shoe on the pavement to slow down your speed. Be sure to keep your weight centred over the board and apply pressure evenly to avoid losing balance or control.

      • Turning

        Turning is a crucial skill in downhill longboarding, as it allows you to navigate sharp turns and maintain control while riding at high speeds. There are two main types of turns in downhill longboarding: heelside and toeside.

        To perform a heelside turn, shift your weight onto your heels and initiate the turn by applying pressure to the edge of the board with your toes. Lean into the turn and use your body weight to control the speed and direction of the turn. To perform a toeside turn, shift your weight onto your toes and initiate the turn by applying pressure to the edge of the board with your heels. Lean into the turn and use your body weight to control the speed and direction of the turn.

        • Sliding

          Sliding is a technique that involves intentionally losing traction with the ground and sliding the board sideways. Sliding is a useful skill in downhill longboarding, as it allows you to maintain control and reduce speed while riding at high speeds.

          To perform a slide, start by carving into a turn with your weight on your front foot. Once you reach the apex of the turn, shift your weight onto your back foot and initiate the slide by leaning back and pushing your back foot out. As the board starts to slide, keep your shoulders and hips aligned with the direction of the slide, and use your front foot to steer the board in the direction you want to go.

          • Equipment

            In addition to technique, having the right equipment is crucial for downhill longboarding. A good downhill longboard should have a stable and sturdy deck, with a low center of gravity